Tag Archives: Comparison of Dove Campaign

Conclusion of my First Travel

Now that my trip to London is nearing an end, it is time to draw my final conclusions regarding the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. Through months of research and interviews in the U.S. and U.K., I am able to sum up key findings, such as differences, similarities, and how to apply my work to my future professional career.

 Key Differences

  • Tactics. The tactics implemented in the U.K. campaign differed from those that were implemented in the U.S. A tactics I especially enjoyed hearing about was one implemented in the U.K. for Valentine’s Day.  A digital, interactive billboard was placed in busy Victoria Station in London. The billboard asked viewers to text or tweet to tell Dove about what makes a special someone beautiful. I favored this tactic over others because I think it complimented the interactive, audience-based nature of the campaign.
  • Concerning Issues. Just as I mentioned in a previous post, the issues the Dove Campaign touched upon differed depending on which country the campaign was targeting. For examples, the U.S. campaign focused much more on weight, body size, and image. Though, the U.K. campaign was more weighted on the stigma of aging.

Key Similarities

  • Engagement. Looking at the way the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty engaged the target audience, the U.S. and U.K. campaigns were the same. The masterminds at Ogilvy & Mather and Edelman kept the campaign current and up to date by turning to social media to engage the audience. Just as Stephen Waddington, digital director for Ketchum Europe, suggested public relations is shifting to a digital and social world. With this, brands must participate accordingly and engage audience online. The Dove Campaign successfully did this by asking consumers to engage in dialogue about real beauty online, both in the U.S. and U.K.
  •  Objectives. After research and interviews, I found the objectives of the Dove Campaign, which can be read about in a previous post I created.These objectives mirrored each other in both the U.S. and U.K.

Additional Key Findings

  • Reputation. Since the Dove Campaign is a worldwide public relations campaign, I talked to Gemma Webb, Marketing and Evaluation Manager for the Public Information and Outreach Service of the Houses of Parliament, to find out how Parliament maintains a well-viewed reputation with the public. The creators of the Dove Campaign faced a problem: how to spark a conversation about real beauty with women, while still selling products and getting the Dove name out to the public. I asked Gemma how Parliament implements cause-related campaigns, while still gaining publicity for Parliament but at the same time, not only promoting how great it is. Gemma’s answer was simply put. She said “don’t just promote yourself.” She went deeper to say to be successful, Parliament or in this case the Dove brand, must build trust, create dialogue, and always remain transparent. In other words, let the audience know the intent, objectives, and outcomes of the campaign.
  • Dialogue. Also as Gemma mentioned to me, cause-related campaigns must build dialogue. The Dove Campaign was spot on with this, since one of its objectives was to spark conversation between women about real beauty. Gemma told me cause-related PR is a two-way process. So, Dove did its part by tailoring the campaign to its target audience, creating a conversation among the audience, and answering back to them. The dialogue must be interactive between the involved parties.

Group shot of the Global Ad & PR class at the Parliament Outreach presentation. Photo credit: Michele Ewing.

 So, what’s next?

Now that my global comparison of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty is hitting the finish line, it’s time to point out how this will continue to be applicable to me. Since I would like to pursue a career in cause-related public relations, the information gathered throughout this project will set me ahead. I now know the ins and outs of a giant, successful, and worldwide campaign. I have done a semester-long amount of research and interviews with top professionals. I would be proud to show a prospective employer the work I completed to globally compare the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty.

An Analysis Across the Pond

Now that I have been to London for nearly a week, it’s time to crack down on my area of expertise, the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. I have already come to realize a few key differences through my research.

Key Differences 

First, the tactics implemented by the Dove Campaign in the U.S. differ with those implemented in the U.K. One main difference is the issues the campaign centered around depending on which country was being targeted. In the U.S., image, size, and looks were heavily emphasized. Though, on the U.K. side of the campaign, issues surrounding aging and appearing “old” were much more touched upon.

Experts to Help Me Get There

The interviews I plan to conduct while my stay in London are the following:

Gemma Webb– Marketing and Evaluation Manager for the Public Information and Outreach Service of the Houses of Parliament. I plan to talk to Ms. Webb about the process the Outreach Services goes through to target the public when dealing with cause-related campaigns.

Laurence Evans- President International at Edelman and was involved in writing the original plan for the Dove Campaign implementation in the U.K. I would like to hear what Mr. Evans included in the communication objectives and best practices were that were included in his original copy.

I am also searching for someone in London who has insight on body image issues. I think this would add powerfully to my area of expertise to compare with the research and interviews I concluded in the U.S. portion of insights.

Building Anticipation

I am more than ready to learn more and more about the Dove Campaign. I am ready to gain knowledge all about the differences about the campaign to compare in the U.S. with that of which I will find here in the U.K.